TAFP Blog

  • ABFM invites board-certified family physicians to enroll in PRIME Registry free for the first three years

    Tags: primeregistry.org, PRIME Registry, ABFM, MIPS, CPC+, ABFM Diplomates, Performance Improvement activity tool

    By ABFM staff

    PRIME Registry is a practice and population data tool developed by the ABFM that safely extracts patient data* from your electronic health records and turns it into actionable measures, presented in an easy-to-use, personalized dashboard, maintaining its full confidentiality. PRIME not only simplifies quality reporting for payment programs such as MIPS and CPC+, but also allows you to better evaluate aspects of your practice, patient groups, and individual patients, illuminating gaps or successes in patient care.

    Another bonus for ABFM Diplomates is the integrated Performance Improvement activity tool. This allows Diplomates to easily use EHR data to complete PI activities and earn points toward the ABFM continuous certification requirements.

    more
  • Transitioning from resident to new physician

    Tags: Alyssa Molina, transition, resident to physician

    By Alyssa Molina, MD

    When it comes to residents transitioning into practice, there are a few things I would stress. Know where you would like to be on the job continuum between autonomy and security. You could have a completely autonomous position. You own your own practice, you decide when you’re opened, when you are closed, and what you do. While you’ll have complete autonomy, you won’t have security. If you are sick and you don’t come to work, you don’t get paid. At the other end of the spectrum, you have the security of being employed by a practice. In that practice, they decide how many patients you see, how many vacation days you get, and so on. There’s very little autonomy, but you have job security. You always get a paycheck, and it doesn’t matter how many patients you see. Most jobs are somewhere in the middle so, it’s important that you figure out for yourself, and your family, where you are comfortable on the spectrum.

    Where I’m currently employed, I have a lot of autonomy. If I choose to take off, I just make sure I’m not on call and that someone’s covering the clinic. I’m paid based on my productivity so there isn’t a certain number of days I have off each year. If I’m willing to take a smaller paycheck, I could take off more days and still have a job when I get back. Where I am on the continuum provides me with a base. They do all the billing for me, so I don’t have to worry about that.

    more
  • Chewing on a big fat wad of gum

    Tags: presidents letter, february, Janet Hurley, wad of gum

    By Janet Hurley, MD

    Changes in health care have been fast and furious in the last several years. The advent of MACRA created the need to prepare for MIPS and APMs, and more robustly report on quality and cost. There is an ongoing desire for interoperability and EMR modifications requiring more “clicks” than we would like. Many physicians have added new types of team members to their practices, such as social workers, nurse navigators, or care coordinators to reach out to patients in new creative ways.

    Some of this has been good for patients, and some of it possibly not. Some days it feels like physicians are chewing a big fat wad of gum, and feeling choked.

    more
  • MIPS 2018 update: Revised claims codes for quality measure reporting

    Tags: Merit-based Incentive Payment System, MIPS quality measure, QDC, TMF, TMF Health Quality Institute

    By TMF Health Quality Institute

    Eligible clinicians participating in the Merit-based Incentive Payment System who plan to report MIPS quality measures using claims should be aware that some claims codes have changed for the 2018 performance period. Following are answers to common questions about the claims-based reporting.

    Question: We noticed some of the 2018 Quality Data Codes for claims submissions have changed. If my practice submits claims using the previous codes, will they count toward our MIPS quality measure submission for the 2018 period?

    more
  • The Primary Care Leadership Collaboration empowers the next generation

    Tags: Primary Care Leadership Collaboration, family medicine for america's health, primary care progress, PCLC, Baylor University's FMIG, Justin Fu, AAFP's National Conference

    By Perdita Henry

    Leaders aren’t born, they are made. Good leaders know how to listen, they know how to communicate, they practice what they preach, and they know how to encourage their team members to utilize their unique talents. They also know how sharing their values through storytelling can inspire others to join their mission. The American Academy of Family Physicians, Family Medicine for America’s Health, and Primary Care Progress recognize the importance of leadership training, which is why they joined forces to create the Primary Care Leadership Collaborative.

    “Building on the unique strengths of each of the partner organizations, this yearlong learning collaborative will provide structured teaching, coaching and support to enable teams of Family Medicine Interest Group participants to have significant impact on the state of primary care delivery and education at their local institutions and in their communities,” the PCLC stated in a frequently asked questions document distributed to participants.

    more
  • Q&A: MIPS Reporting for 2017

    Tags: TMF Health Quality Institute; Merit-based Incentive Payment System; MIPS; MIPS Submission Options; TMF MIPS Toolbox;

    By TMF Health Quality Institute

    Clinicians participating in the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) path of the Quality Payment Program (QPP) must report their 2017 data to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) between Jan. 2 and March 31, 2018. (The data submission window for clinicians using the CMS Web Interface is Jan. 22 to March 16.) Following are answers to common questions about the reporting process.

    Question: How many MIPS measures and activities do I need to report for the 2017 performance year?
    Answer: For the 2017 transition year, clinicians may report using the test, partial-year or full-year option. Those who go beyond the test option can earn a positive payment adjustment. Minimum reporting requirements for each are:

    more
  • Funded delegate spots and scholarships available for NCCL and ACLF

    Tags: aclf, nccl, funded delegate spots, scholarships, special constituencies

    Each year, AAFP holds the National Conference of Constituency Leaders and Annual Chapter Leader Forum together in Kansas City, Missouri. NCCL representatives and ACLF attendees from across the nation gather to discuss various issues, suggest policies and programs to AAFP, and receive leadership training. In 2018, the conferences will be held April 26-28 and TAFP is looking for members to serve on the delegation or apply for scholarships to attend.

    TAFP opportunities for NCCL
    Spots are available for five TAFP members to represent each of the five constituencies: new physicians (physicians who have been out of residency for seven years or fewer), women, minorities, international medical graduates, and LGBT. TAFP reimburses up to $1,200 for expenses for each delegate. In addition, TAFP offers two other opportunities to attend NCCL with funding. These scholarships will be awarded to one third-year resident and one minority physician.

    If you are interested in being considered for one of the delegate slots, please send a current curriculum vitae and/or a statement of intent to Jonathan Nelson at jnelson@tafp.org by Friday, Feb. 2, 2018. Be sure to let him know which constituency or constituencies you would like to potentially represent.

    more
  • What happened to Tar Wars?

    Tags: Jeff Cain, MD, Glenna Pember, Hall of Life and Doctors Ought to Care, tar wars, perdita henry, TAFP Commission on Public Health, tobacco trends, poster competition

    By Perdita Henry

    In 1988, Jeff Cain, MD, and Glenna Pember, of the Hall of Life and Doctors Ought to Care, had an idea about keeping kids away from tobacco products. They would go on to create Tar Wars, an educational program for fourth- and fifth-grade students. In the 30 years since the first class, Tar Wars has reached more than 10 million children across the globe. The program was eventually bought by AAFP and it became an opportunity for local family physicians, residents, and students to visit classrooms and discuss the health risks associated with smoking, the financial costs of the habit, and the sneaky ways advertisers market their product to young people. In the last few years, the program hasn’t seemed to bring the passion and excitement that it once did. The TAFP Commission on Public Health, Clinical Affairs, and Research wants to see that change.

    At a number of commission meetings, members have reminisced about visiting children in their community and teaching them the importance of remaining tobacco free. Visiting schools with the Tar Wars message, by all accounts, seemed to bring joy to students and participating physicians alike. “I loved those mornings at school,” says John Carroll, MD. “I had five classrooms to visit and I spent 35 to 40 minutes with each. We flew through the discovery of being targeted by the second largest public advertising campaign.” After spending time with their local physician, the kids had the opportunity to create their own posters featuring their personal brand of tobacco-free messaging. Those posters were then submitted to state chapters and one would be chosen as the state winner. The Texas winner would receive the prize of hotel and airfare to present at the Tar Wars National Poster competition.

    more
  • Step 1: Get to it and through it

    Tags: Paging Student Dr. Kendra, Kendra Williams, McGovern Medical School in Houston, texas, Step 1

    By Student Dr. Kendra

    Step 1, the rite of passage for every medical student. It seems like torture to get to and go through, but it’s the one thing that can affect the trajectory of your whole career in medicine. It’s a daunting task but it seems like everyone — for the most part — has gotten through it pretty well. The journey to it and through it can be ugly, but hopefully, I can offer you some preparation tips that will successfully get you where you want to be. It can seem overwhelming, but focusing on your schedule and the resources available to you can help get past. I will outline my schedule, the resources I choose, and the review techniques that worked best for me.

    A few things to note first:

    more